Connecting with others—good for business as well as health

We were fascinated by this Harvard Business Review piece on the impacts of loneliness by former Surgeon General Vice Admiral Vivek Murthy, which talks about recent evidence that social isolation shortens lifespans in a way similar to smoking 15 cigarettes a day.  It is—perhaps unsurprisingly—also bad for business.

“At work, loneliness reduces task performance, limits creativity, and impairs other aspects of executive function such as reasoning and decision making. For our health and our work, it is imperative that we address the loneliness epidemic quickly.”

And the trend towards disconnection and isolation is getting worse—new models of working remotely and factors like the rise of the “gig economy” create flexibility for workers but reduce the structural community-making of a traditional workplace. Researchers for Gallup found that having strong social connections at work makes employees more likely to be engaged with their jobs and produce higher-quality work, and less likely to fall sick or be injured.

Dr. Murthy does not mince words, calling the problem an epidemic. “If we cannot rebuild strong, authentic social connections, we will continue to splinter apart — in the workplace and in society. Instead of coming together to take on the great challenges before us, we will retreat to our corners, angry, sick, and alone. We must take action now to build the connections that are the foundation of strong companies and strong communities — and that ensure greater health and well-being for all of us.”



Hilary Wilson

Author: Hilary Wilson

Hilary Wilson is Associate Director of CSC. Her background in non-profit development and community building strategies helps with understanding the landscape of opportunities for communities everywhere.

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