Realities of modern lending remind us what we’re working on

A recent article from Inc. Magazine is reminding us what we’re working for: a better financial ecosystem for small business. The article describes the negative relationships between banks and some small business owners following the financial crisis.

When it comes to the future of small business in America, it’s easy to say that “small business is important to our economy” and leave it at that, but we should really take it a step further. We’ve learned from our economy over the last few years that strong, local economies will require networks of many strong, small businesses.

This is not to say that big business is bad or has no place in our future. It’s just to say that we’ve done a great job supporting big business for a while now, and it’s probably time to focus some more energy on our friends at the “small” end of the business spectrum.

Back to the article– author Burt Helm draws examples of successful small businesses being dumped by big banks because of their industry, major trends in big bank density across the banking landscape, and it asks what might change to fix the whole system.

My own understanding of systems suggest that this current dominant system probably won’t change anytime soon. It’s too big to move, too big to adapt, too big to… well, you get it.

Instead, we can focus on introducing new financial systems that make the entire ecosystem more sustainable. At Community Sourced Capital, we believe these systems will (and should) more heavily involve large groups of people (read: communities) in decision making, and ultimately, in an ongoing education about how our financial system works in the first place.

All this said, I think it’s important to specify when you might see exactly what we’re talking about at CSC . We’re designing and testing sustainable financial solutions, and that process requires lots of care and patience. The last thing we want to do is scale half-baked solutions that end up harming small businesses, or worse, the local economies we’re trying to strengthen.

If sustainable finance, design and collaboration piques your interest like it does ours, then I strongly encourage you to read through this article. Then, consider taking our short survey on small business lending in your own community.

Casey Dilloway

Author: Casey Dilloway

Casey is the President and COO of Community Sourced Capital. On a day to day basis, Casey is working on CSC's technology, back-end operations, and taking part in crafting the story of community finance. He really enjoys making presentations about sustainable finance, too.

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