Need a small business loan? Attend CSC’s Money on a Mission event!

Money on a Mission Event - get a small business loan
Money on a Mission Event – attend to explore small business loans

More often than not a small business owner needs the opportunity to do lots of things all at once – from managing people, community relations, and inventory management to payroll, social media and financial planning for future growth. That’s an awful lot and we’ve heard from the small businesses we work with that managing their business finances can be the most difficult part of running the business because it’s not where their heart and passion lies.
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Small business helping small business: part one

Conventional wisdom might say that if you have a web/technology-based business-to-business service company, then the pathway to rapid growth and revenues is to target large Fortune 500 companies as clients. Seattle enjoys the presence of many of those Fortune 500s: Microsoft, Boeing, Starbucks, Amazon, Zillow, and Expedia, just to name a few. Yet, Community Sourced Capital looks to businesses like A&R Solar, Starvation Alley Farms and Playback Sports as the future of our local living economy. These are the companies that make our neighborhoods more interesting to live and play in.

We get to work with these owners directly. There’s no corporate board vetting decisions and their possible impacts on quarterly earnings. Decisions are made by small business owners and CSC because they are the right thing to do and because they “pencil out.”

Both A&R and CSC experience success because of something we call social capital. Both of us are working against the grain, but we have lots of people supporting us. A&R installs solar (successfully) in the cloudy Pacific Northwest, and Community Sourced Capital runs a financial services company on the basis of sharing money. It’s a tough job, but somebody has got to do it. Somebody has to run these small businesses to bolster a new economy, and it probably won’t be big Fortune 500 businesses.

As I heard last month from a client, “it’s time for small businesses to start helping each other, no one else is.” It reflects the frustrations of small businesses owners drowning in marketing messaging from big banks and government about how important small businesses are to the health of the economy, but without action to back it up. I’d like to argue that, while we are nowhere close to being too big to fail, neither are we too small to succeed. We have to work together.

As CSC moves forward, we’re staying as true as possible to our small businesses customers, because we’re a small business too. We need each other to succeed.

This is the first in our series Small business helping small business.

Harvesting Social Capital: a renewable resource

This week, we’re launching our third and most ambitious campaign to-date with A&R Solar, a Seattle-based renewable energy company. Having A&R approach us to help them raise money for their new office space is an honor. One of the highest compliments I’ve received in my young business career was from Dave Kozin (A&R Solar’s CFO), stating “we could probably find other ways of financing this project, but we want to do it with you guys. We think it will be more fun getting CSC and our community involved.”< It's this kind of intuitive and values-based decision making in business that I identify with, and it's where I see CSC having continued success in the future. Actually, there are a lot of parallels between the two companies. Both are small, owner-operated, bootstrapped service businesses. A&R is a registered B-Corp. CSC is a Social Purpose Corporation. Both are built with sustainability at the core of the business model. We’re creating new jobs in a radically different economy than we might have planned for a decade ago.

In prepping for A&R’s $20,000 Squareholder Campaign, we spent the afternoon shooting a campaign video in their new headquarters (it’s a bit empty in the picture above) with a few members of the team. It was way too much fun to be considered work.

And having fun matters. Every day, the way we carry ourselves in the world impacts relationships and connections to those around us–either growing them stronger, letting them fall apart, or missing opportunities to build new ones by blowing by at life’s busy pace and forgetting to look up and meet your neighbor. Social capital fosters reciprocity and the willingness to share resources–knowledge, connections, equipment or even money!

So, how do we put social capital to work? After all, social capital is a renewable resource if we are conscious in how we use it. Consider the companies CSC has had the honor of working with so far. Each harvests a renewable resource, generating new value without being extractive. Recycling sporting goods at Playback Sports, organic farming of a perennial berry with Starvation Alley Farms and now solar energy with A&R Solar.

CSC’s business model is intentionally designed in a similar way. We harvest social capital in the form of shared money. In returning the money to Squareholders, we don’t deplete their ability to share it again. We believe this is part of a larger movement as we transform how we collectively think about money. We’re grateful for the small business owners, the squareholders and all the people in our world who are making their decisions based on their deepest values. This is what will bring in a new economy!